Myco boat trailers are serious hunks

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  • Myco boat trailers are serious hunks

    I saw this very stout boat trailer a few days ago. The main frame beam is a foot tall. All sorts of cool adjustments. 4 spares. Big electric wench. Should have gotten some better pics.

    Not as pretty as Tom's Myco under his Axopar though....

  • #2
    Originally posted by Pstephens46 View Post
    I saw this very stout boat trailer a few days ago. The main frame beam is a foot tall. All sorts of cool adjustments. 4 spares. Big electric wench. Should have gotten some better pics.

    Not as pretty as Tom's Myco under his Axopar though....
    Myco I'd have to say is at the top on the Aluminum heap.
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    • #3
      I've seen some at the factory in Bradenton that are unbelievable. They had one for a huge MTI cat with full hydraulic tilt because it is ~13' beam, angled the whole boat up at ~45 degrees to fit on the road. Fifth wheel, of course, for the custom tractor to haul it, custom paint, LED's everywhere. A work of mechanical art for sure.
      Sanibel FL
      Axopar 28 Cabin, 2 x 200 Merc 3.4L V6

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      • #4
        I could appreciate those tilt trailers, right up my line, gives pause, maybe I'll tow one when I retire , for a rich owner, not myself..
        BWP

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        • #5
          Originally posted by TomS View Post
          I've seen some at the factory in Bradenton that are unbelievable. They had one for a huge MTI cat with full hydraulic tilt because it is ~13' beam, angled the whole boat up at ~45 degrees to fit on the road. Fifth wheel, of course, for the custom tractor to haul it, custom paint, LED's everywhere. A work of mechanical art for sure.
          Website claims all of the trailers have pressurized hubs I assume to prevent water intrusion. How’s does this work? Can the diy guy work on these or does a shop have special equipment to recharge them? Is there an indicator to show you if the hub becomes unpressurized?

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Pstephens46 View Post

            Website claims all of the trailers have pressurized hubs I assume to prevent water intrusion. How’s does this work? Can the diy guy work on these or does a shop have special equipment to recharge them? Is there an indicator to show you if the hub becomes unpressurized?
            It's absolutely all DIY stuff, VERY simple once installed. They use the EZ-Lube spindle along with the Air-Tight pressurized hub protector. You just use a bicycle pump with a needle to keep ~10psi in the hub, the rubber cap will tell you immediately (visually) if there is any issue with the pressure, e.g. seal is leaking, etc. If you regularly have to add air, then it's getting time to replace that seal. I just look at it every time I get in the truck to tow. During regular use the pressurized hub keeps water and contaminants out of it.

            https://www.airtighthubs.com/products/index/10

            The EZ-Lube allows you to purge the old grease, installing new, without taking it all apart. Just hand pump it in through the center grease fitting on the spindle and it squeezes the old out through the bearing on the outside. You still need to pull it apart every so often to inspect the bearing condition, but it is much less frequent than for a typical setup. I had these on our horse trailer for years, many miles, and even I could do it, which says a lot. The bearings lasted forever on it, but I re-greased fairly often too. I never needed any special tools to do all this.

            https://www.dexteraxle.com/resources...-z-lube-system

            Sanibel FL
            Axopar 28 Cabin, 2 x 200 Merc 3.4L V6

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            • #7
              Very interesting..
              2016 Tidewater 230 CC VF250 SHO
              Mobile, Al.
              Dauphin Island, Al.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by TomS View Post

                It's absolutely all DIY stuff, VERY simple once installed. They use the EZ-Lube spindle along with the Air-Tight pressurized hub protector. You just use a bicycle pump with a needle to keep ~10psi in the hub, the rubber cap will tell you immediately (visually) if there is any issue with the pressure, e.g. seal is leaking, etc. If you regularly have to add air, then it's getting time to replace that seal. I just look at it every time I get in the truck to tow. During regular use the pressurized hub keeps water and contaminants out of it.

                https://www.airtighthubs.com/products/index/10

                The EZ-Lube allows you to purge the old grease, installing new, without taking it all apart. Just hand pump it in through the center grease fitting on the spindle and it squeezes the old out through the bearing on the outside. You still need to pull it apart every so often to inspect the bearing condition, but it is much less frequent than for a typical setup. I had these on our horse trailer for years, many miles, and even I could do it, which says a lot. The bearings lasted forever on it, but I re-greased fairly often too. I never needed any special tools to do all this.

                https://www.dexteraxle.com/resources...-z-lube-system
                I am fortunate to have the EZ-Lube spindles on boat and horse trailer. The pressurized Hub protector is a neat option. Thanks for the explanation.

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                • #9
                  I saw a real X triple axle trailer today and it was impressively what I consider overbuilt which is the way I roll.
                  BWP

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