Trailer brake pads

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  • Trailer brake pads

    The brake pads on my trailer suck big time. The pads should be more corrosion resistant. After a short while the pads swell up in the calipers and then bind up the caliper. The next thing you know your driving down the street with 1 brake caliper pinching the rotor just enough to heat up and start smoking. Its BS!

  • #2
    Originally posted by Surfercross View Post
    The brake pads on my trailer suck big time. The pads should be more corrosion resistant. After a short while the pads swell up in the calipers and then bind up the caliper. The next thing you know your driving down the street with 1 brake caliper pinching the rotor just enough to heat up and start smoking. Its BS!
    Is it the pads, or the caliper puck not retracting back into housing?
    The pads, if they are actually swelling up (I'm not familiar w/ this but I'm a car guy) should still push caliper puck back into housing.
    Do you have a pic of problem you're dealing with?
    I don't quite understand how the pads swell beyond the size of backing plate causing caliper to bind - but as said, I'm a car guy.
    Sounds like a caliper problem, or caliper pin and/or caliper slide problem.
    I believe you, just can't wrap my head around this without a pic or two.

    ’19 Invincible 36 - 350 Verado’s Sold
    ’20 Invincible 35’ Cat, Quad Verado’s on order
    Fairhope & Orange Beach, AL

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    • #3
      Kodiak, Kodiak, Kodiak.

      For example, Kodiak “first” include *stainless steel pistons *ceramic brake pads with stainless steel backing plates *brass bleed screws *stainless steel brake hose flare fittings.
      Engine Sales and Service
      Ph +1 954.463.1515
      Fx +1
      954.463.4904
      Toll Free: 800.622.6747

      [email protected]
      www.parkeryacht.com

      Member of the MSHS Group

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      • #4
        What type of material are your brake pads? I buy organic pads and never have had trouble.
        2010 Sea Ray 205 Boston Whaler dauntless 15 W/75 merc 14' Shakespeare Wondercraft W/Merc110 17' Gheenoe W/Johnson 4.5 Other assorted watercraft

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        • #5
          The pads are not swelling. Possible sticking in the slides due to rust. Most common is a Tiretyme said, piston sticking. Disc brakes have no springs to pull piston back into caliper when brakes are released. They use a square o'ring that cocks a little when brakes are applied. When released the o'ring lays back flat, pulling the piston back with it. As the pads wear, the slip through the o'ring some and then be pulled back just the amount of o'ring cockedness. This is what makes them self adjusting. When everything is working right, when released the pads are all but rubbing on the rotor.
          Small town S. W. Ga./St. James Fl.

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          • #6
            Its the metal backing that is swelling from corrosion. The piston doesn't seem to be sticking but I could be wrong. I have dee max brakes on my trailer now and they don't make a brake pad that has stainless steel backing plate.

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            • #7
              They make some grease esp for caliper slides. It may help you some. CRC makes a good synthetic with graphite. Everything is just going to be a band-aid (some better than others) till you go all stainless.
              Small town S. W. Ga./St. James Fl.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Surfercross View Post
                Its the metal backing that is swelling from corrosion. The piston doesn't seem to be sticking but I could be wrong. I have dee max brakes on my trailer now and they don't make a brake pad that has stainless steel backing plate.
                Ok, think I got you! The backing plate kinda starts to look like plywood delaminating?
                Eventually the pad will lose bonding w/ backing plate and come apart, then cause caliper to blow from puck/piston coming out too far.
                I don't trailer often and just replaced my calipers and pads w/ DeeMax - 5 year old trailer.
                Used DeeMax because it really sits 99% of year, and trailering distances are usually less than 50 miles annually.
                If I trailered often, would definitely pony up for the Kodiak.

                I coat them with fluid film, they still rust some.
                Use liberal amounts of anti seize on pad backing plate, caliper pins and slides - this helps.
                I'd suggest changing pads post haste as they are way cheaper than calipers, and cover the metal w/ anti seize.
                Use a wire brush first to clean up slides.

                Also, assuming you have a standard hydraulic actuator, there should be some grease fittings there too.
                When decoupling from tow vehicle, pull back forward to release actuator.
                This will allow hydraulic fluid to release pressure on calipers and may aid in rinsing additional salt residue from brake componets.

                Hope this helps, and makes sense!
                Seems to be a perpetual PIA w/ trailers.....brakes, tires, lights......but I still need them occasionally.
                Let us know how it shakes out.
                ’19 Invincible 36 - 350 Verado’s Sold
                ’20 Invincible 35’ Cat, Quad Verado’s on order
                Fairhope & Orange Beach, AL

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                • #9
                  You pretty much hit the nail pn the head. I was hoping Dee Max made stainless steel pads but they don't. I am going to change the pads ASAP.
                  Thanks for the help by the way.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Surfercross View Post
                    You pretty much hit the nail pn the head. I was hoping Dee Max made stainless steel pads but they don't. I am going to change the pads ASAP.
                    Thanks for the help by the way.
                    Don't be afraid to cover all the metal backing plate w/ anti seize. It's not going to rinse off quickly unless you put a pressure washer to it. Just keep it off pad material best you can. A small tube will go a long way and should do the trick. Coat pins and slides too.

                    And remember, when parking trailer after trip, pull forward a tad before uncoupling. This will take pressure off or kinda release master cylinder, which in turn will allow caliper pistons to retract some off the rotor. This keeps the pad material from sticking to rotor. I chock the trailer wheels, and then ease forward an inch or two before jacking up off the hitch.

                    Hope this makes sense??
                    ’19 Invincible 36 - 350 Verado’s Sold
                    ’20 Invincible 35’ Cat, Quad Verado’s on order
                    Fairhope & Orange Beach, AL

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                    • #11
                      Gonna try that new technique with the new pads.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Parker Yacht View Post
                        Kodiak, Kodiak, Kodiak.

                        For example, Kodiak “first” include *stainless steel pistons *ceramic brake pads with stainless steel backing plates *brass bleed screws *stainless steel brake hose flare fittings.
                        Kodiac stainless. Worth the money. Hate trailers.....

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