UOA: 2019 Yamaha Waverunner FX Cruiser HO - Amsoil Marine 10W-40

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  • UOA: 2019 Yamaha Waverunner FX Cruiser HO - Amsoil Marine 10W-40

    Here is my oil change using Blackstone Labs for analysis with AMSOIL INC. 10W-40 Marine in a Yamaha 1.8L

    * My first oil change was at 5 hrs using Yamalube and then at 10 hrs which I then switched to Amsoil. All oil changes have used the OEM Oil Filter as shown.

    ** Just to note I have used Ethanol Free Gas exclusively and have used Sta-Bil Marine 360 in every top off.

    As you can see from the photos of the filter, there are small ( > 20 micron) aluminum specs. Nothing to be concerned about as it's normal and the oil concludes that as well.

    For those that are curious, it's $28 for the oil analysis. This is very common in Aerospace and many other industries so I'm not that far off...well, OK, maybe a little but it's my world.

    https://www.blackstone-labs.com/
    https://www.amsoil.com/shop/by-produ...?code=WCFQT-EA

    Click image for larger version

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    Attached Files
    Last edited by jtw18; 11-15-2019, 09:03 PM. Reason: Amended report

  • #2
    Nice.
    What are you pushing? Blackstone, AmSoil or Both?
    Engine Sales and Service
    Ph +1 954.463.1515
    Fx +1
    954.463.4904
    Toll Free: 800.622.6747

    [email protected]
    www.parkeryacht.com

    Member of the MSHS Group

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    • #3
      Pushing? Neither, just sharing.

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by Parker Yacht View Post
        Nice.
        What are you pushing? Blackstone, AmSoil or Both?
        You've met before. He has a really nice ski now, but he needs a bigger bote
        Sanibel FL
        Axopar 28 Cabin, 2 x 200 Merc 3.4L V6

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by jtw18 View Post
          Pushing? Neither, just sharing.
          Just asking, how did you pick Blackstone for oil analysis?
          Engine Sales and Service
          Ph +1 954.463.1515
          Fx +1
          954.463.4904
          Toll Free: 800.622.6747

          [email protected]
          www.parkeryacht.com

          Member of the MSHS Group

          Comment


          • #6
            They're well known and easy to deal with. Also less expensive compared to who I've used in the past for work. They also test to the ASTM standards which is important, as you know

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            • #7
              I've used Blackstone for years, right in my old home town :-)
              Sanibel FL
              Axopar 28 Cabin, 2 x 200 Merc 3.4L V6

              Comment


              • #8
                Honestly, we don't do much (any) testing. The other day we did a survey on a new engine and they asked for it.
                Never have really seen an engine fail due to wear.
                It might be worth it on lower units, but even then, they fail quickly.
                Engine Sales and Service
                Ph +1 954.463.1515
                Fx +1
                954.463.4904
                Toll Free: 800.622.6747

                [email protected]
                www.parkeryacht.com

                Member of the MSHS Group

                Comment


                • #9
                  Right, it's not that they will fail due to wear...it's to catch early signs of failure before it's catastrophic. Also, it can be good for extending the oil life if that's of interest for some that use them many hours where the down time is an issue. Basically it's piece of mind and cheap insurance of what's going on where you can't see.

                  The reality is that you can use any decent oil and filter that meets the specs and chances are the engine, gearbox or drive will be fine if one follows the service interval. This goes for anything.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Parker Yacht View Post
                    Honestly, we don't do much (any) testing. The other day we did a survey on a new engine and they asked for it.
                    Never have really seen an engine fail due to wear.
                    It might be worth it on lower units, but even then, they fail quickly.
                    Ditto. Not discounting the oil testing service at all, but in reality, I honestly can't recall the last engine in 35 years of being in the business that failed due to oil type failure. Or even an engine that was worn out in that way. We have parts customers overseas that put 1000's of hours on engines with the basic original short blocks.

                    Sure, we see oil pump failures and overheats take out engines, but can't recall one actually wearing out.
                    Andrew Munao Jr
                    Yamaha Sales/Tech Support, SIM Yamaha
                    888-231-2392 | [email protected] | simyamaha.com

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      The only time we have had oil/fuel analysis done was when sabotage/vandalism was a possible cause.
                      Small town S. W. Ga./St. James Fl.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by SIM View Post

                        Ditto. Not discounting the oil testing service at all, but in reality, I honestly can't recall the last engine in 35 years of being in the business that failed due to oil type failure. Or even an engine that was worn out in that way. We have parts customers overseas that put 1000's of hours on engines with the basic original short blocks.

                        Sure, we see oil pump failures and overheats take out engines, but can't recall one actually wearing out.
                        What you might see is fuel dilution as well as water from say a leaking gasket. There is more to it then just engine wear from oil and I wouldn't be so quick to discount it. There's a reason why it's so common in Aerospace and every other type of industry. It's all about mitigation.

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by jtw18 View Post

                          What you might see is fuel dilution as well as water from say a leaking gasket. There is more to it then just engine wear from oil and I wouldn't be so quick to discount it. There's a reason why it's so common in Aerospace and every other type of industry. It's all about mitigation.
                          I am not discounting it at all. Hope I didn't come off that way.

                          I know with the few engine failures under warranty I have dealt with, the manufactures have never asked for an oil sample for inspection. Unless you are consistently doing the samples and tracking, a one time analysis to me is for informational purposes.

                          Water in oil is usually easy to see and detect. Fuel, not so much, unless it raises the engine oil level. Which does happen to all 4-stroke manufactures for various reasons. I don't know of a outboard manufacture that will have any engine replaced because of a irregular oil analysis. They usually prefer to have things fail before they replace them.

                          I understand the aerospace part of it. Keeping track is a good thing.
                          Andrew Munao Jr
                          Yamaha Sales/Tech Support, SIM Yamaha
                          888-231-2392 | [email protected] | simyamaha.com

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by SIM View Post

                            I am not discounting it at all. Hope I didn't come off that way.

                            I know with the few engine failures under warranty I have dealt with, the manufactures have never asked for an oil sample for inspection. Unless you are consistently doing the samples and tracking, a one time analysis to me is for informational purposes.

                            Water in oil is usually easy to see and detect. Fuel, not so much, unless it raises the engine oil level. Which does happen to all 4-stroke manufactures for various reasons. I don't know of a outboard manufacture that will have any engine replaced because of a irregular oil analysis. They usually prefer to have things fail before they replace them.

                            I understand the aerospace part of it. Keeping track is a good thing.
                            Yeah I'm not saying that any manufacturer would replace something (or even crack the case) based on an oil analysis. That said they might be able to lower their warranty costs if they did though. Aerospace and big ships it's a must along with many other industrial equipment as the cost of downtime is far too expensive.

                            For instance, I used to run a servo hydraulic rig and you replaced the 400 gallons of Mobil DTE-25 when the analysis said it was time, not any sort of written time. That was based on oil shear and ultimately you could see how the actuators were doing based on the metals in the oil. This was analyzed by Mobil's lab and certified as the rig was $2.5M

                            Personally, expensive boat motors/drives that you depend on, I'd sample them just in case and it's great documentation down the road too.

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                            • #15
                              So after studying the UOA above, I realized that there was potential for an error. Low viscosity and low fuel usually isn't the case. I figured that fuel content was causing the anomaly so I requested a retest of the fuel. As you can see, the fuel content is higher than normal. So after thinking about where it was coming from, I started to investigate.

                              Here is the result:
                              Click image for larger version

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