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  • #46
    My turn.

    My name is Adam, I’m 61, born and raised in the suburbs of Dayton Ohio. Married up in 1985, have three daughters and two grandsons. Grew up in the family home building business which took a hit in 2007 (along with an old business plan and family business dynamics) so transitioned into working alone as a builder. This was possible as my wife worked hard moving from nursing into IT (Did I mention that I married up?)

    Boated as a kid on Lake Cumberland in Kentucky from the time I was 7, till I got into my high school years. Didn’t go much because didn’t want to miss any parties. Always wanted to get back into boating, always liked Boston Whalers, so I started looking for boats in early 2020. Was thinking of going used and my wife (Did I mention I married up) convinced me to buy new. Negotiated over the phone on a Montauk 170 and drove 4 hours away to pick it up the next day.

    My wife and daughters started vacationing in Orange Beach Alabama in the early 90’s. Once we became empty nesters, we started a week in the spring, and then the fall. Always thought it would be neat to have our own place, so we purchased a condo in 2019 Ended up buying a condo in November of 2019, spent 30 days over the winter renovating, and had it on the rental market two weeks before the Covid shutdown.

    Currently shopping for a Montauk 210, busy as I want to be with work and truly blessed that my bride has yet to figure out she could have done much better.

    Comment


    • Tiretyme
      Tiretyme commented
      Editing a comment
      What condo complex?
      I’ve had 3, sold all 3, and waiting on next downtick before buying another.

    • BamaBoater
      BamaBoater commented
      Editing a comment
      Best sports fan - Not retired now, but as I often say, “Busy as I want to be”. Although I am building a couple of units right now, and the Framer is having trouble getting/keeping help, and some rain. May have to strap on my tool pouch again.

    • BamaBoater
      BamaBoater commented
      Editing a comment
      Tire time - Winddrift Bayside. I bought at the right time, but not as an investment, but to keep and enjoy.

  • #47
    Oceanfront High rise condos all along Floridas east coast are falling apart from rusted steel.

    Comment


    • Lprizman
      Lprizman commented
      Editing a comment
      And shitty installation

    • Billinfla
      Billinfla commented
      Editing a comment
      Steel reinforced concrete has NOT stood the test of time with oceanfront applications. Only the most diligent property managers take care of the buildings properly. I wouldn't take a concrete oceanfront condo if it was free. Yes I'm a contractor.

  • #48
    Tom here, just turned 65. Been boating my whole life. My parents used to tie a long line to the rowboat and let me go at it, knowing they didn't have to watch every second to make sure I didn't go out of sight. I wasn't clever enough to untie it. My brother and I pulled an old wood rowboat out of our grandfather's barn, and Dad helped us replace some bad boards. We had saved our nickels and bought a 3 HP air cooled motor from Montgomery Wards (16-1 oil mixture I think).

    I grew up on the Severn River in MD and we went to the Trent Severn area in Canada for vacation every summer since I was 8. Dad got an aluminum boat with a pull start 33 hp Johnson when I was about 10, and I learned to ski behind it. My brother and I were allowed to take it out after we proved we could pull start it.

    Burned a lot of gas fishing and skiing in high school. Dad moved up to a 17' tri-hull with a 65 hp Johnson. That thing was a little underpowered, when meant we ran it full blast most of the time. Wore that engine out, got an 85, wore that one out and got a 115. It actually lasted until the boat got sold. I've had my own 17' and now 19' Dual Console since '94.

    I got a degree in Mechanical Engineering, and met the future Mrs Barefoot in the college marching band. We've been married 42 years, 2 great kids that are out on their own and both married (no grandkids yet).

    I worked on Navy stuff for almost my entire career. Submarine and ship stuff at first, then airplane stuff for the last 25 years. I was 60 when I retired. I liked my job, but had other stuff I wanted to do.

    After a year of looking, we bought a cottage in Canada in '17 after the kids were off the payroll. I did a fairly extensive reno on it over the fall of '18 and spring of '19. Covid caused me to miss going up there in '20 for the first summer since 1965.

    Comment


    • Bstnsportsfan
      Bstnsportsfan commented
      Editing a comment
      Sounds like you’ve enjoyed a good life! Your childhood sounds like a lot of fun and many memories.

  • #49
    Hello everybody, nice to see a lot of mature older folks here. Sweet!

    John here, lived in Florida since 78. Married with 4 grown kids.
    College educated with a few trades under the belt.

    Blind, crippled and half crazy. These days I'm beginning to think the screwballs running loose are the mentally challenged ignorant crazy ones. Never underestimate other's Ignorance or Stupidity!

    Use to be in the building and manufacturing industries.
    Forced into retirement about 8 years ago due to life altering injuries which killed all of my sporting hobbies, including boating. :-(
    Took up glass blowing about 3 years ago and still at it here and there depending on how I'm feeling any given day.

    Do as much reading these days as I can but that too is going to come to an end sometime in the near future unless I can find an ophthalmologist, aka eye surgeon, who is willing to try and correct the issues I have with my remaining "good" eye. Have no idea why I originally said: Optometrist. Now I'm the village idiot. 😀


    Have seen 5 surgeons to date within the last 18 months for the eye issues and not a single one will offer to operate due to liability issues. In fact, all have refused and blown me off.
    Had 2 that flat out old me they wouldn't operate for all the money on earth due to possible liabilities. Life's a Bitch...........
    So if I seem a little irritated sometimes it's nothing personal. I will promise that I'll never be disrespectful to others without being disrespected first and then I'm going to tell you about your ass and probable hurt your little feelings. Boohoo, tough shit. Grow up, don't be disrespectful to others and you won't have to worry about getting corrected, scolded and told off.
    From the looks of BOB member roaster these days I don't think that will be an issue.

    Use to be into high performance drag bikes and just about every other death defying sport.
    Life has been a real trip and once heck of a roller coaster ride for sure.

    Best of wishes to everybody with a long life ahead of you. It's the little things in life that many take for granted. Life is short.
    Last edited by Riptied; 08-06-2022, 12:49 AM.

    Comment


    • bluewaterposer
      bluewaterposer commented
      Editing a comment
      You are a good MAN Joey, stay blessed!

    • Smitty45
      Smitty45 commented
      Editing a comment
      Have you contacted Bascom Palmer ? The operated on both my wife's eyes , great Dr's

    • Riptied
      Riptied commented
      Editing a comment
      Thanks for reaching out gentlemen. Good to see others reaching out to help one another in uncertain times as we currently live in. Joey, I would love to speak with your Dr. friend about the issues and see if we can get this ordeal resolved once and for all. At least until they stuff me in a pine box. :-)

  • #50
    Been reading all the posts and thinking about all the good people on here. Figured it's about time I chimed in.

    Names Paul. 7th generation FL native, business owner, good mechanic and all around general redneck.
    Born in Jacksonville on Pearl Harbor day 1961 (my mom always blamed my reckless attitude and behavior on that). As I have mentioned in other threads we were poor. Dirt Poor. Lived in a pickup truck, sleeper cab of a broken down cab over Ford, and eventually a small house. We were there for a few months until one morning they showed up with an excavator to tear it down.

    I caught the fishing bug because we fished almost every day. If we didn't catch anything we had rice and beans. If we caught something we had rice and beans with fish. When your dinner depends in something, you get pretty good at it.
    My mom, brother and I moved (ran away) to Orlando in 1968. She worked 2 jobs and we learned to take care of ourselves while she was working (I was 7 my brother was 5) we ate alot of van camps pork and beans with hotdogs.

    At 12yo in the summer and on weekends my stepfather put me on with a crew installing pallet rack. I didn't like that and went back to Jax and found out what it was like to use a shovel and tie rebar in the bottom of pools in July. Figured out that rack wasn't so bad and came back to Orlando.
    Still doing rack to this day.

    Worked in the family Forklift/Pallet Rack business from 1975 to 2009. Swept floors, steam cleaner, mechanic, road mechanic, parts dept, service manager, salesman and sales manager. We built it pretty big and had branches in 3 cities. Had a lady embezzling $$$$$ money in 2007. Two months later the economy stopped. By 2009 I was back to being poor again and started over.

    Been married twice. First wife left me with my 2yo daughter and 4yo son. I raised them. Second wife left when she saw the money was going to run out.

    I have always had a boat of some sort. Most were total POS but they floated, mostly. Up until lately I always did my own repairs on everything. Engines, wiring, fiberglass,,, you name it. Just Don't have the time lately so I have learned to have it done.

    No formal college degree. I did go to Community College at night for a bit but trying to raise 2 kids on your own makes that a little tough.

    Have a total of 5 kids (3 are stepkids) and 3 grand kids. Made sure they all went to work at 16 and college. We have an Attorney, Nurse, Chemical Engineer, Nuclear Engineer and a drug addict (whom we have NO contact with). I figure 4 out of 5 isn't to bad.

    My Girlfriend/Fiancé/Wife and I have been together 13 years and she still won't marry me. Oh well, as long as it is working I shouldn't complain.

    Comment


    • #51
      Andy Munao. Born and raised in the Chicago suburbs(Mt Prospect), moved to Washington Island Wisconsin after graduating from Wyo-tech for auto body/collision repair in 1984. While I was away at school, my parents purchased a marina on the island. After I graduated I had my own auto shop for a couple of years, until I lost it in a fire. After that I came into the family business and have been here ever since. My parents are in their 80s and are still semi-active in the business, which is very cool. Love having them still active. They take most of the winters off and go to their new home in Ft Meyers.

      Married my wife Lisa in 1992 and just celebrated 30 wonderful years. Could not ask for a better person to share life with. We have 4 children( twin boys and 2 girls). Both of our girls(Rachelle and Roxy) work in the business. Our sons Joey and Andy work off island. Joey works for a automotive accessories company and Andy is a associate pastor at a church in Eustis Florida. We have 7 grandchildren and two more on the way!

      The island was always our vacation home while growing up. So been around boats for as long as I can remember. My parents cottage was on a beach so growing up we were there all day weather permitting. Dad got us a 12ft Sears aluminum boat. Had a 7.5 Merc on it. Some reason I can't remember we acquired a 6hp Johnson so we figured out how to put twins on that 12ft boat and tie the tillers together with wood and rope. We put rocks in the bow to keep the bow down. The boat was finally fast enough to tow a wakeboard behind it(not sure they were called that back in the 70s)lol . We were told never to leave the bay by the cottage, but one day we gathered the courage to go all the way around the island. To this day, not sure our parents know. Might as well break the news. lol

      In 2010 I found salvation in Jesus Christ. Life changing. Thank you Lord!

      I am 57 now and I am not disabled by any means, but not as physically able to do the things I could once do(jumped off to many boats), but that's OK. I make up for in experience lol. Just when I thought I have seen everything in a boat, just yesterday had a new one. Customer with twin 454XL Crusaders wanted us to install his own starter motor on one of his engines. My nephew goes over to the dock where the boat is at and installs it. Doesn't try to start it, just makes sure it cranks over, which it does. Customer calls and says engine cranks over now but doesn't start. Nephew goes over and checks it out, gets frustrated and brings the boat over on one engine. We look at it and with the flame arrestor off, it starts pushing air and fuel out. $%&$ customer supplied starter motor is spinning the engine backwards! Back then the big block GM could spin either direction, customer ordered the wrong starter motor.

      Over the last 35 or so years been involved in almost all aspects of boats. Sold several different brands of new boats, used boats of every size, repowers to many to count, extended hulls, shaved blisters, rebuilt stringers, replaced any part imaginable. Customers ask what kind of boat I own, and until last year I didn't. Why would I want to go out in a boat? Boats are just sitting there waiting to break! lol New or used, doesn't matter. But last year we bought a pontoon boat with a Yamaha T50. It is awesome! Wife and I putz around the harbor and when its calm, we go around the island. Its like driving around in a living room! 13mph is very nice and very relaxing.

      Besides the pontoon, my hobbies (or things I like to do outside of work) are doing stuff with the church, spending time with kids and grand kids, and working on my house. We bought it when we got married and over the years I built an addition to it with my dad(former mason contractor) and have remodeled every portion of it and added a detached garage. We are in the final stages of redoing our kitchen(we had a galley kitchen so we removed a bath and one bedroom to make it bigger) Have the drywall finished and am getting ready to install the cabinets. We have a temp kitchen that is bigger than our original kitchen. Thankful my wife is patient with me!

      It's a mountain and a valley
      It's a cradle and a grave
      It's a blessing and a battle
      And it's on any given day
      It's messy and imperfect
      It's a thief and it's a gift
      Yeah, this life ain't always wonderful
      But what a wonderful life it is


      Thanks for reading, and may God bless you all!
      Andrew Munao Jr
      Yamaha Sales/Tech Support, SIM Yamaha
      888-231-2392 | [email protected] | simyamaha.com

      Comment


      • Tiretyme
        Tiretyme commented
        Editing a comment
        Andy, I can't imagine the gut wrenching loss of your business in a fire……must have been awful to say the least.
        On the positive side, you landed in a great spot and can promise you that I think I’d of much rather spent 25 years in the marine repair business rather than automotive repair business but have zero complaints

      • SIM
        SIM commented
        Editing a comment
        I think the two are similar. But at least with our business, I am on the water most days. Our local business, we have a wonderful customer base. Most have been with us for years. My biggest gripe would be the lack of time off during the summer. I come in on Sundays just to have alone time and get paperwork done. Outside of that, its all good.

        I just love these lyrics, they are so true.

        It's a mountain and a valley
        It's a cradle and a grave
        It's a blessing and a battle
        And it's on any given day
        It's messy and imperfect
        It's a thief and it's a gift
        Yeah, this life ain't always wonderful
        But what a wonderful life it is

        I have nothing to complain about. But.....I can always find something! lol

    • #52
      1) Make sure you have 3-4" clear on the hinge side of the refrigerator.
      2) Cabinets must sit level with the finished floor. Do not butt flooring up to the cabinets.
      3) Make sure there are adequate fillers next to walls and inside corners.
      4) I use light rail and LED tape strip lighting (low Voltage)
      5) Lighting/LED comes in different "color temperature" of white. Warm is reddish, cool is bluish. Do NOT use cool light with wood or brown surfaces. Use cool with whites!
      6) Use an air switch button for the disposer. Neat touch.

      Comment


      • #53
        Originally posted by Billinfla View Post

        1) Make sure you have 3-4" clear on the hinge side of the refrigerator.
        2) Cabinets must sit level with the finished floor. Do not butt flooring up to the cabinets.
        3) Make sure there are adequate fillers next to walls and inside corners.
        4) I use light rail and LED tape strip lighting (low Voltage)
        5) Lighting/LED comes in different "color temperature" of white. Warm is reddish, cool is bluish. Do NOT use cool light with wood or brown surfaces. Use cool with whites!
        6) Use an air switch button for the disposer. Neat touch.
        Thanks for the pointers on 1-5, think I am with you on that. Number 6, wife hates disposers. Something to do with never working in apartments she lived in years ago.
        Andrew Munao Jr
        Yamaha Sales/Tech Support, SIM Yamaha
        888-231-2392 | [email protected] | simyamaha.com

        Comment


        • #54
          Establish a level line 34 1/2" above finish floor at highest point of floor. Set base cabinets first to this line level from wall out.

          Next set wall cabinets to 54" above finish floor. I use a cube to set upper cabinets on. The cube sits on the base cabinets (which ARE level?) Set cabinets one at a time. If you have to squeeze them with a clamp something is wrong!

          Use a long straight edge to make sure the front edge of the cabinets is straight. Shim out from the wall if necessary.

          Make range opening is square! 30" is common. Measure diagonals.

          A counter depth refrigerator does NOT fit in a 24" deep space. Always allow 2" or so behind the refrigerator.

          Comment


          • #55
            Originally posted by Billinfla View Post
            Establish a level line 34 1/2" above finish floor at highest point of floor. Set base cabinets first to this line level from wall out.

            Next set wall cabinets to 54" above finish floor. I use a cube to set upper cabinets on. The cube sits on the base cabinets (which ARE level?) Set cabinets one at a time. If you have to squeeze them with a clamp something is wrong!

            Use a long straight edge to make sure the front edge of the cabinets is straight. Shim out from the wall if necessary.

            Make range opening is square! 30" is common. Measure diagonals.

            A counter depth refrigerator does NOT fit in a 24" deep space. Always allow 2" or so behind the refrigerator.
            Again...thank you for the pointers. I had other ideas for hanging the wall cabinets first, but yours make sense with the bases installed.

            With the refer, we have a standard depth refer( I did not want a counter depth one). The wall behind it is in a bedroom closet, so I removed the studs up partially behind the refer(non supporting wall), left the closet drywall and finished the back side of it that is behind the refer to I can get the refer back 4 inches more. It looks like a little pocket in the wall. Power for the refer is overhead in the pocket which clears the refer when its slid in. The 2x4 floor plate misses the bottom of the refer because of the 3/4 plywood that is the 2nd layer of sheeting over the original plywood. They had pressed board for the 2nd sheeting, which was all ripped out and replaced.
            Andrew Munao Jr
            Yamaha Sales/Tech Support, SIM Yamaha
            888-231-2392 | [email protected] | simyamaha.com

            Comment


            • #56
              You guys rock with all the experts and help provided, even from Bill

              BWP

              Comment


              • #57
                Originally posted by SIM View Post

                Again...thank you for the pointers. I had other ideas for hanging the wall cabinets first, but yours make sense with the bases installed.

                With the refer, we have a standard depth refer( I did not want a counter depth one). The wall behind it is in a bedroom closet, so I removed the studs up partially behind the refer(non supporting wall), left the closet drywall and finished the back side of it that is behind the refer to I can get the refer back 4 inches more. It looks like a little pocket in the wall. Power for the refer is overhead in the pocket which clears the refer when its slid in. The 2x4 floor plate misses the bottom of the refer because of the 3/4 plywood that is the 2nd layer of sheeting over the original plywood. They had pressed board for the 2nd sheeting, which was all ripped out and replaced.
                Ref pockets work great. Ice maker line?

                Refrigerator end panel? End panels are often 24", but countertops are 25.5". If you can get a 27" to 30" end panel, the countertop "dies out" neatly. 27" deep panel, pull the 24" deep refrigerator bridge cabinet forward 3", leaves ventilation for behind the refrigerator.

                Comment


                • #58
                  I've done this for decades. I've taught guys how to install cabinets. Gotta use a level and a lot of shims.

                  What to screw to and thru is another lesson.

                  Comment


                  • #59
                    If your range is electric an 18" clearance is required between the counter top and the bottom the cabinet or light rail. If gas (flame) 20" is required. Unless that's been changed in the last 8 years.

                    Comment


                    • #60
                      Originally posted by Riptied View Post
                      If your range is electric an 18" clearance is required between the counter top and the bottom the cabinet or light rail. If gas (flame) 20" is required. Unless that's been changed in the last 8 years.
                      18" is the general distance between counter/range top and upper cabinets. Custom hoods are generally 24" to 30"..we do 30"

                      A 36" hood over a 30" stove is ideal but not required.

                      Comment

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