Interesting read on electric cars

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  • Interesting read on electric cars

    IF ELECTRIC CARS DO NOT USE GASOLINE, THEY WILL NOT PARTICIPATE IN PAYING A GASOLINE TAX ON EVERY GALLON THAT IS SOLD FOR AUTOMOBILES, WHICH WAS ENACTED SOME YEARS AGO TO HELP TO MAINTAIN OUR ROADS AND BRIDGES. THEY WILL USE THE ROADS, BUT WILL NOT PAY FOR THEIR MAINTENANCE!
    In case you were thinking of buying a hybrid or an electric car:
    Ever since the advent of electric cars, the REAL cost per mile of those things has never been discussed. All you ever heard was the mpg in terms of gasoline, with nary a mention of the cost of electricity to run it. This is the first article I've ever seen and tells the story pretty much as I expected it to.
    Electricity has to be one of the least efficient ways to power things yet they're being shoved down our throats. Glad somebody finally put engineering and math to paper.
    At a neighborhood BBQ, I was talking to a neighbor, a BC Hydro Executive. I asked him how that renewable thing was doing. He laughed, then got serious.
    If you really intend to adopt electric vehicles, he pointed out, you had to face certain realities. For example, a home charging system for a Tesla requires 75 amp service. The average house is equipped with 100 amp service. On our small street (approximately 25 homes), the electrical infrastructure would be unable to carry more than three houses with a single Tesla, each. For even half the homes to have electric vehicles, the system would be wildly over-loaded.
    This is the elephant in the room with electric vehicles. Our residential infrastructure cannot bear the load. So as our genius elected officials promote this nonsense, not only are we being urged to buy these things and replace our reliable, cheap generating systems with expensive, new windmills and solar cells, but we will also have to renovate our entire delivery system!
    This latter "investment" will not be revealed until we're so far down this dead-end road that it will be presented with an 'OOPS...!' and a shrug.
    If you want to argue with a green person over cars that are eco-friendly, just read the following. Note: If you ARE a green person, read it anyway. It's enlightening.
    Eric test drove the Chevy Volt at the invitation of General Motors and he writes, "For four days in a row, the fully charged battery lasted only 25 miles before the Volt switched to the reserve gasoline engine.
    "Eric calculated the car got 30 mpg including the 25 miles it ran
    on the battery. So, the range including the 9-gallon gas tank and the 16 kwh battery is approximately 270 miles.
    It will take you 4.5 hours to drive 270 miles at 60 mph. Then add 10 hours to charge the battery and you have a total trip time of 14.5 hours. In a typical road trip, your average speed (including charging time) would be 20 mph.
    According to General Motors, the Volt battery holds 16 kwh of electricity. It takes a full 10 hours to charge a drained battery.
    The cost for the electricity to charge the Volt is never mentioned, so I looked up what I pay for electricity.
    I pay approximately (it varies with the amount used and the seasons) $1.16 per kwh. 16 kwh x $1.16 per kwh = $18.56 to charge the battery. $18.56 per charge divided by 25 miles = $0.74 per mile to operate the Volt using the battery. Compare this to a similar size car with a gasoline engine that gets only 32 mpg. $3.19 per gallon divided by 32 Mpg = $0.10 per mile.
    The gasoline-powered car costs about $25,000 while the Volt costs $46,000 plus. So the Canadian Government wants loyal Canadians not to do the math, but simply pay twice as much for a car, which costs more than seven times as much to run, and takes three times longer to drive across the country.
    Small town S. W. Ga./St. James Fl.

  • #2
    Yes, the cost of driving electric vehicles is not advantageous to the "normal" Joe..
    As of April 2nd, boatless for the first time in many years.
    2019 Tidewater 252 CC Twin F150's- SOLD
    2016 Tidewater 230 CC VF250 SHO- SOLD
    Mobile, Al.
    Dauphin Island, Al.

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    • #3
      The story doesn't add up, 3 homes will overtax the grid, please.

      I didn't read further then that.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by LFBB View Post
        The story doesn't add up, 3 homes will overtax the grid, please.

        I didn't read further then that.

        there may be some validity to that.

        let me talk to my neighbor. He’s one of those guys and he mentioned something to me once upon a time how the service is stepped
        down for the neighborhoods

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        • #5
          $1.16 per kW-Hr...

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          • #6
            The whole electric thing is way more complicated than it first appears, simply plugging in your car at home to charge it is not the answer, never was, never will be. I have no doubt that full electric vehicles are in the future, but not yet, until renewable/free charging becomes viable, electric cars will just be for hairy armpit green tree huggers. The biggest issue now is charging time, no amount of sun or wind can charge your cars batteries in a few minutes like you can fill up your fuel tank. All this might take a back seat IF (and it's a big if) a new, safe and efficient (cheap) alternative is found. It's possible if we have nuclear power plants, electricity "might" become cheap enough to setup charging stations at shops and offices, but that's only a maybe, and still would require your car parked for long periods to recharge.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by noelm View Post
              The whole electric thing is way more complicated than it first appears, simply plugging in your car at home to charge it is not the answer, never was, never will be. I have no doubt that full electric vehicles are in the future, but not yet, until renewable/free charging becomes viable, electric cars will just be for hairy armpit green tree huggers. The biggest issue now is charging time, no amount of sun or wind can charge your cars batteries in a few minutes like you can fill up your fuel tank. All this might take a back seat IF (and it's a big if) a new, safe and efficient (cheap) alternative is found. It's possible if we have nuclear power plants, electricity "might" become cheap enough to setup charging stations at shops and offices, but that's only a maybe, and still would require your car parked for long periods to recharge.
              Commuter cars, soccer moms, grocery getters... the majority of what cars are used for - electric cars can go days or even a week without needing a charge. Then you plug it in overnight and your good to go.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Jughed View Post

                Commuter cars, soccer moms, grocery getters... the majority of what cars are used for - electric cars can go days or even a week without needing a charge. Then you plug it in overnight and your good to go.
                Yes agree 100%, but plugging in at home is not free, it doesn't save the environment or fossil fuel, and it is not the answer....yet, plugging in at home just moves your fuel bill from the gas station to the power station, as I said, it's way more complicated than it first appears.

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                • #9
                  I wonder how electric cars battery system handles a major car accident? Lithium batteries have been known to run away once damaged. Also the potential energy stored in them is pretty significant . Can the whole become electrified if damaged?

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Surfercross View Post
                    I wonder how electric cars battery system handles a major car accident? Lithium batteries have been known to run away once damaged. Also the potential energy stored in them is pretty significant . Can the whole become electrified if damaged?
                    They burn. But at a much lower frequency than internal combustion vehicles.

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                    https://www.caranddriver.com/news/a3...ls-fire-chief/

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                    • #11
                      One of my future projects is 10 kW of solar on the roof. When that's done, we might consider an electric vehicle for errands.

                      Then again, I might mine crypto.

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                      • #12
                        People should read about some of the battery materials needed for the cars. Rare earth metals
                        Mining operations, release of radioactive elements in the production of needed elements etc
                        cost more environmentally to make a electric car than a gas car

                        side note, guess which country has the largest untapped reserves of rare earth metals?

                        Greenland. Does that ring a bell with anyone?

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                      • #13
                        No thanks for now. Now if they can get the range up to 400-500 miles on a charge then I could see some viability...maybe soon?

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                        • Ol Mucky
                          Ol Mucky commented
                          Editing a comment
                          And pull the boat/camper

                      • #14
                        Originally posted by Surfercross View Post
                        I wonder how electric cars battery system handles a major car accident? Lithium batteries have been known to run away once damaged. Also the potential energy stored in them is pretty significant . Can the whole become electrified if damaged?
                        They burn hot and easily, once they start..
                        As of April 2nd, boatless for the first time in many years.
                        2019 Tidewater 252 CC Twin F150's- SOLD
                        2016 Tidewater 230 CC VF250 SHO- SOLD
                        Mobile, Al.
                        Dauphin Island, Al.

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                        • #15
                          Don't they have to hit 88 mph and a lightning storm for a forever charge

                          BWP

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