Coosa vs Plywood Test (added marine grade ply)

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  • #31
    Originally posted by Comm. (VP) Mike Carrigan Sr. View Post

    The stringer system is the backbone of the bottom, the structure
    Depending on the brand and who your talking to, lots of stringer designs, grids and/or the like
    Prefabed stringers in recent years have become very popular whereas the stringers are bought already made then assembled in the hull after the lamination, the layup, is complete
    What will have 100% agreement is the stringer system determines the strength and rigidness of the bottom, the running surface
    Of course the lamination is crucial as well

    There's a company in the Melbourne area of Florida that's I think the largest provider of pre fabricated stringers
    It's about the most respected composite company and composite engineering company
    First class company and ownership and engineers
    They were very helpful to me on TOS when I was getting ganged up on and I have asked they join us on BOB but no luck as of yet
    Compsys?
    BWP

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    • #32
      I'm still stuck in the 70's when it comes to boat building. Of course that's back when you could a 25' boat , motor and trailer for $7,000. Back then 3 things made a boat hull, resin, glass mat, and wood. Now, I'd bet the liability insurance on each hull is close to the old selling price of the boat.

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      • #33
        Originally posted by bluewaterposer View Post

        Compsys?
        BWP
        Yes

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        • #34
          Originally posted by Sailfish 218 View Post
          I'm still stuck in the 70's when it comes to boat building. Of course that's back when you could a 25' boat , motor and trailer for $7,000. Back then 3 things made a boat hull, resin, glass mat, and wood. Now, I'd bet the liability insurance on each hull is close to the old selling price of the boat.
          Well in my case going back into the 60's to be a gen-u-ine boat builder:
          Chopper gun
          Barn
          A mold from Lord knows where
          Not to forget a pop rivet gun for anything that's shiney

          You is then certified

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          • #35
            Originally posted by Parker Yacht View Post

            This is what saved you. Salt water does not rot wood, fresh water does.
            In the "Olden" days, they salted the bilages in botes/yatchs.
            This is one of the things my father taught me when I was very young that I will never forget. He had a gutsy friend who would take his boat out into the ocean (in the 1960's) to get past the brackish to truly salty water and pull the plug and let water run into his bilge. I don't recall whether he drained it while out there or after he put the boat back on the trailer. Anyway, he did it as a preventative measure to keep his stringers and floor decking from rotting. Nothing was encased in fiberglass on this particular boat. I always wondered if it was just a myth but I guess it may have really helped.
            Last edited by Ric232; 10-07-2018, 04:43 PM.

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            • #36
              Originally posted by Comm. (VP) Mike Carrigan Sr. View Post

              Well in my case going back into the 60's to be a gen-u-ine boat builder:
              Chopper gun
              Barn
              A mold from Lord knows where
              Not to forget a pop rivet gun for anything that's shiney

              You is then certified
              Chopper guns were too expensive for most of the local boaties popping hulls. But I do remember all the pop rivets in the old original Warren Crafts for one. They held in the dual consoles and definitely in all the rub rails. I remember a time coming back from Bimini with a friend who had a 19' Warren Craft from Fisherman's Paradise. His wife was holding the side console up while he steered after all the pop rivets let go. I was in a 19' Dolphin which was high quality compared to his.

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              • #37
                Originally posted by Sailfish 218 View Post

                Chopper guns were too expensive for most of the local boaties popping hulls. But I do remember all the pop rivets in the old original Warren Crafts for one. They held in the dual consoles and definitely in all the rub rails. I remember a time coming back from Bimini with a friend who had a 19' Warren Craft from Fisherman's Paradise. His wife was holding the side console up while he steered after all the pop rivets let go. I was in a 19' Dolphin which was high quality compared to his.
                I knew the brands and the dealer

                We used pop rivets for everything
                Railings, lights, the old cable steering-the pulleys which was pretty much a crime to do to someone in hindsight but then it was how it was done

                I sold F'Man's Paradise Seabreeze until we opened stores in Broward and Dade in around 65 or so
                My employeer owned Seabreeze which was actually a LynnCraft built in Bradenton but we owned the Seabreeze name and marketed LynnCraft as Seabreeze
                If it was attached in a Seabreeze boat it was attached with a pop rivet gun and early on by me if done with the rigging of the boat

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                • #38
                  What holds up better when worn and wet? Seems another test is in order.

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                  • #39
                    Originally posted by LFBB View Post
                    What holds up better when worn and wet? Seems another test is in order.
                    XL wood always contains moisture
                    In other words, it's always wet
                    Use as stringers, floors, transom, I dont know how to make the wood worn
                    It has a fifty year warranty

                    Coosa has the same qualities as wood but 100% a composite weighing in much less than wood
                    I dont think it will hold water
                    It's a plastic thus I dont think "wet" is an issue
                    Same answer as to "worn" in that I dont know how to wear it out?

                    With using both I haven't seen with either one any issues over time and I have about 25 yrs with the XL installations
                    Less, but someting like 13/14 years or so with Coosa

                    Neither one has any natural ememies that I'm aware of

                    Maybe Ken knows of potential issues
                    I do not

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                    • #40
                      Where is Ondarvr? Have not seen him around in awhile. He could add to this thread.

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                      • #41
                        I don't know squat about coosa, hence why I bought a piece to torture lol

                        Ken Reeves
                        KR@Propgods.com
                        941-735-5808

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                        • #42
                          I read your thread on this subject "over yonder". Really enjoyed it. Informative and I always love seeing people with the curiosity, common sense & know-how to investigate for themselves.

                          One thing I didn't see mentioned in either place (admittedly, didn't read every post) was concern over the PT chemicals and galvanic corrosion of all of your aluminum. In general terms, proximity of PT wood and aluminum is a no-no. There's a reason the Nat'l Building Code was revised to address this very issue. Also long standing history problems with it in the tin boat world.

                          For that reason I went with Coosa in my last tin boat build. Mine is vinyl covered & screwed down. I do have a couple Al storage boxes screwed to the floor & thus far they seem more than solid. One doubles as a dog platform and despite a 95 lb lab constantly jumping up & down on it & frequent removal and replacement of the mounting screws (I take it out to fish) threading of the holes thru the Coosa is still solid.

                          My stringers are on 14" centers, which is sufficient to provide a good solid floor with minimal flex, however I do have one transverse seam between sheets of the Coosa where there was not a transverse support installed and there is a small amount of noticeable flex if you step right on that edge in the middle of the stringers. You can feel you have pushed the sheet under foot down relative to the adjacent one. For that reason I'd suggest either H-clips (will show some under your vinyl I'd think), transverse supports at seams, or some stiffener added to the underside like a screwed in piece of Al flat stock or such.
                          Last edited by duckfish; 10-11-2018, 12:49 PM.

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                          • #43
                            Originally posted by duckfish View Post
                            I read your thread on this subject "over yonder". Really enjoyed it. Informative and I always love seeing people with the curiosity, common sense & know-how to investigate for themselves.

                            One thing I didn't see mentioned in either place (admittedly, didn't read every post) was concern over the PT chemicals and galvanic corrosion of all of your aluminum. In general terms, proximity of PT wood and aluminum is a no-no. There's a reason the Nat'l Building Code was revised to address this very issue. Also long standing history problems with it in the tin boat world.

                            For that reason I went with Coosa in my last tin boat build. Mine is vinyl covered & screwed down. I do have a couple Al storage boxes screwed to the floor & thus far they seem more than solid. One doubles as a dog platform and despite a 95 lb lab constantly jumping up & down on it & frequent removal and replacement of the mounting screws (I take it out to fish) thread threading of the holes thru the Coosa is still solid.

                            My stringers are on 14" centers, which is sufficient to provide a good solid floor with minimal flex, however I do have one transverse seam between sheets of the Coosa where there was not a transverse support installed and there is a small amount of noticeable flex if you step right on that edge in the middle of the stringers. You can feel you have pushed the sheet under foot down relative to the adjacent one. For that reason I'd suggest either H-clips (will show some under your vinyl I'd think), transverse supports at seams, or some stiffener added to the underside like a screwed in piece of Al flat stock or such.
                            Never thought about that, I did read a lot that related to trailer Bunks with aluminum boats, and most recommended a barrier between the bunks and the boat. Didn't even think about the decking.

                            Ken Reeves
                            KR@Propgods.com
                            941-735-5808

                            Comment


                            • #44
                              To my knowledge CCA is long gone from the PT lumber world, BUT most current treatments still include some form of copper. If you're up for another experiment, lay a piece of bare copper wire across a piece of Al out in the weather. The results aren't pretty.

                              For the same reasons, I'd suggest if you are screwing the floor in to an Al support structure with SS screws, coat each & every screw with MareLube TEF45, or similar, first. Cuts down drastically on the corrosion issues created between those dissimilar metals and if you ever have to take the screws back out, will save a ton of frustration.

                              As far as wood for the deck.... any decent, stiff enough plywood for the deck, with 2 coats of just 2 part epoxy, will likely outlive you and the next owner. I simply spent the extra money for Coosa to save some weight.

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                              • #45
                                When they changed the formula for PT wood about 10 years ago, they also changed the type of screws or nails to be used with it. I'm not sure but I think there was also a lot of salt added which corroded and ruined the normal steel screws and nails.

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