Two lucky Sailors

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  • Two lucky Sailors

    Biggest thing, they stayed with the boat.

    http://www.apalachtimes.com/news/20180411/found-at-sea

  • #2
    Your correct
    Staying with the boat is all important

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    • #3
      Lucky guys.
      Engine Sales and Service
      Ph +1 954.463.1515
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      954.463.4904
      Toll Free: 800.622.6747

      oparker@parkeryacht.com
      www.parkeryacht.com

      Member of the MSHS Group

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      • #4
        Originally posted by Comm. (VP) Mike Carrigan Sr. View Post
        Your correct
        Staying with the boat is all important
        Agree
        Always hang with it if you can
        '12 Blackwood - 300 Verado's (for sale - pending)
        '17 Nor-Tech 340 - sold
        '18 Fountain 38 - sold
        ’19 Invincible 36 - 350 Verado’s (on order)

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        • #5
          I'm know two of three guys who were in the water for I believe it was two days
          Only a small section of the bow remained afloat which allowed one person at a time to be on top of the section and they took turns
          I believe that by staying with the boat they survived

          The terrible loss of two Tampa Bay football players was I think caused by their leaving the capsized boat
          The survivor was found as I recall clinging to the upside down outboard motor

          I think exposure and dehydration cause the loss of some reason and cause actions that regretably are a reason for the deaths
          In the case of the guys I know one of the three did become dillusional and had to be restrained by the other two

          The law requires that boats under 20' must meet the Federal Boat Safety Act standards and with max weight, power and people may swamp but not sink and not capsize
          Twenty feet and above is voluntary and called "Basic Foam"
          The law came into effect in 1971
          Today there's sophisticated ways to establish the below 20' requirements but early on there were no such computers and the like
          A boat manufacturer I was involved with we met the requirement by my putting my wife,our four children and myself in the boat, pulled the plugs and let it swamp with us aboard
          It worked
          We didn't sink nor did we capsize and after the test I left with the same wife and kids I arrived with and no one missing

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          • #6
            they still had their sail up. i guess in michigan the weather doesn't turn as quickly as it does here...

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            • #7
              For the benefit of us less experienced boaters, maybe some of you "old salts" (Ole, Capt. Mike, etc.) can point out the mistakes that these fellows made. What more should they have noticed about the weather and the seas as they approached the storm? Could / should they have seen this coming earlier in their trip? If so, what should they have done?

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              • #8
                The sad thing with those football players is they made a rookie mistake that even the coast guard boating safety course I took 30 years ago covered. Don’t try to dislodge an anchor by tying off to a rear cleat and gunning the engine. IIRC they said you shouldn’t pull with any clear, and if the anchor is that stuck, you cut the rope and kiss it goodbye. I also read the book by the lone survivor. Apparently they didn’t want to cut the rope because the guy had already lost $300 in anchor and rope about a month earlier. I can understand that, but when you’re 40 miles out in a 23’ CC, you should exercise better judgement, carry an epirb, and most importantly don’t go out that far without a basic safety class where they’ll tell you to not do what they did.

                Exhaustion, stress, and hypothermia can cause you to make a lot of bad decisions. The guys who left the boat were probably thinking about as well as the people who climb Everest and strip off their clothes and wander off to die. You Florida people ever hear of mountains?

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Porscheguy View Post
                  The sad thing with those football players is they made a rookie mistake that even the coast guard boating safety course I took 30 years ago covered. Don’t try to dislodge an anchor by tying off to a rear cleat and gunning the engine. IIRC they said you shouldn’t pull with any clear, and if the anchor is that stuck, you cut the rope and kiss it goodbye. I also read the book by the lone survivor. Apparently they didn’t want to cut the rope because the guy had already lost $300 in anchor and rope about a month earlier. I can understand that, but when you’re 40 miles out in a 23’ CC, you should exercise better judgement, carry an epirb, and most importantly don’t go out that far without a basic safety class where they’ll tell you to not do what they did.

                  Exhaustion, stress, and hypothermia can cause you to make a lot of bad decisions. The guys who left the boat were probably thinking about as well as the people who climb Everest and strip off their clothes and wander off to die. You Florida people ever hear of mountains?
                  All of that being said it was a terrible tragedy

                  My point being that the 23' Everglades did it's job and did remain afoat although capcized
                  Beginning at an LOA of 20' there is no floatation requirement at all
                  It's voluntary
                  The "Basic Foam" that Everglades adheres to says much about the quuality and safety of the product
                  The boat did what it was supposed to do
                  The brands I sell also meet the "Basic Foam" requirements

                  The point being, stay with the boat
                  Hopefully all or a portion will remain afloat thus increasing your survival odds immensley

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