Wood in a boat aint' no dirty word

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Wood in a boat aint' no dirty word

    I guess I'm one of the guilty people that made wood in a boat about the same as calling someone's mother a name.
    Pro-Line went to no wood, all composite beginning in 1994
    On the Donzi side we tried it but learned real fast that wood is stronger and on the hi-performance side we learned in many applications wood was far superior to composite

    Customers ask all the time "Is there any wood in this boat"?
    The very sound of wood in the boats structure sends chills down the potential buyers spine

    Well, I admit to being one of the many and one of the very first to offer very bad information re wood

    Wood is a four letter word but it aint' no dirty word


  • #2
    You also remember how badly we Wellcraft guys got beat up over the failure of wood stringers in St Tropez, Coastal and Gran Sport models in the eighties. Many companies shot themselves in the foot for not properly coating limber holes in stringers and for not caulking-or using the right caulk-in through hull or through transom situations. But many companies like Parker have had great success with wood applications over the years since they did things right.
    The new "no rot" plywood products with their lifetime warranties are a great help except for one thing---they rot, just not as fast. But I do agree that we hear about not wanting wood in aboat all the time And the good Lord knows we have made a fair amount of money replacing stringers and transoms not to mention some floors.
    Having said all that, people will still pay a premium for a 26 Lyman in most any condition. It's all relative I guess.

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by erie skipper View Post
      You also remember how badly we Wellcraft guys got beat up over the failure of wood stringers in St Tropez, Coastal and Gran Sport models in the eighties. Many companies shot themselves in the foot for not properly coating limber holes in stringers and for not caulking-or using the right caulk-in through hull or through transom situations. But many companies like Parker have had great success with wood applications over the years since they did things right.
      The new "no rot" plywood products with their lifetime warranties are a great help except for one thing---they rot, just not as fast. But I do agree that we hear about not wanting wood in aboat all the time And the good Lord knows we have made a fair amount of money replacing stringers and transoms not to mention some floors.
      Having said all that, people will still pay a premium for a 26 Lyman in most any condition. It's all relative I guess.
      The "No wood No rot" stickers on transoms are a great marketing tool
      The transoms I sell have no wood and that's exactly what people want to hear

      When my oldest son and I were doing our (his) project boat we went into alot of thought re wood stringers, floors, transom, the whole enchalada vs composite
      I wanted wood
      XL wood with a fifty year warranty, heavy and strong as mortal sin when encapsulated with perhaps 24OX W/R
      That bottom, stringers, transom aint' never gonna break but is big time heavy
      My son won out and all composite but I'll tell ya, not as strong as my way

      If I have it to do, which I wont because I aint' stupid enough to do project boats no more, but if I did it would be Greenwood XL and encapsulated
      I'm 73 years old
      If I have a problem in the next fifty years with the XL I'll just have to live with it when I'm one hundred twenty three

      Comment


      • #4
        And you'll make it to then no problem; Lord only knows what boats will look like by then. Toured west coast of MIchigan this week for wifey's birthday. Had lunch on the water at Grand Haven today and watched coal freighter Calumet pull into port. A little over 600 feet and the skipper handled her like a 30 footer. Fun to watch. Pretty sure she doesn't have any wood in the hull though.

        Comment


        • #5
          I think wood in boats is good...

          Attached Files

          Comment


          • #6
            My 1983 25' Rampone (Whitewater) has a lot of wood. transom, stringers, floor, gunnels, console, etc. The only thing that does use encapsulated wood is the hull. i replaced the tanks two years ago and checked all over. Transom and stringers solid as the day they were made. same with gunnels, floor and console. there was one little spot right near where the fuel fill line comes up from the floor where a small piece of wood, about 2"x2" was mounted for some unknown reason that was a little soft. The rest was fine.

            Properly encapsulated wood is structurally sound and will last for decades. as will my 3/16" aluminum replacement tank. I dont know what these folks are doing to cause their transoms to rot and tanks to corrode. Maybe the same folks who are blowing up powerheads with 200 hours. Never done that either. but of course, I run my engines wide open at least once each trip.

            I'd love to own a epoxy/strip composite boat. but my skills are not there. There is something about the ride of a wood boat that fiberglass or aluminum just cant match.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by manitunc View Post
              My 1983 25' Rampone (Whitewater) has a lot of wood. transom, stringers, floor, gunnels, console, etc. The only thing that does use encapsulated wood is the hull. i replaced the tanks two years ago and checked all over. Transom and stringers solid as the day they were made. same with gunnels, floor and console. there was one little spot right near where the fuel fill line comes up from the floor where a small piece of wood, about 2"x2" was mounted for some unknown reason that was a little soft. The rest was fine.

              Properly encapsulated wood is structurally sound and will last for decades. as will my 3/16" aluminum replacement tank. I dont know what these folks are doing to cause their transoms to rot and tanks to corrode. Maybe the same folks who are blowing up powerheads with 200 hours. Never done that either. but of course, I run my engines wide open at least once each trip.

              I'd love to own a epoxy/strip composite boat. but my skills are not there. There is something about the ride of a wood boat that fiberglass or aluminum just cant match.
              Old friend of mine owned snapper boats (big ones)
              He'd let me log flying hours and I'd fly him to Louisiana where he had some steel hulls built
              He was however very partial to wood hulls which he had built in Alabama
              He told me he just didn't like the sound and feel of the steel hulls and the noise the steel hatches made annoyed him

              In LA I believe the builder was LaFete but I'm sure I murdered the Cajun spelling
              In Alabama it was Buddy Resmundo who was a famous builder of wood commercial boats and I really enjoyed just hanging out there although I'm sure I annoyed him by asking really stupid questions all the time

              Comment


              • #8
                I still think the best rest I ever got was sleeping on our old wooden boat .

                Comment

                Working...
                X