1970 Eagle 40 Trawler

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • 1970 Eagle 40 Trawler

    I recently bought a 1970 Eagle, 40-foot trawler with a Ford Lehman 120.
    I am told the Ford Lehman is bullet proof and it starts every time with no problems, it also has a 7.5 kW, Kubota diesel generator which runs well also. The previous owner had bought her as a project from the original owner but never finished her and sold her to a friend who was working trying to finish her when I bought her. When we went to change all the fuel filters the guy that I was buying her from told me that the original owner was a diesel mechanic who resided in the Bahamas and even showed me some pictures and documentation to prove it. He also told me that the original owner used to burn cooking oil mix with the diesel. The fuel filters had a black gooey stuff in them especially at the bottom of the crystal or glass dome of the filter. I asked and I was told that it was residual matter from burning cooking oil by the guy who was selling it to me? However, a few days ago (I have had the trawler for 2.5 months now) I was told that the black stuff I saw was in actuality a living organism that grows in diesel? Now, of course, I am worried. I bought biocide, but I read that it should be introduced into the tank while it is being filled?

    I was also told about water in the diesel tank and was given a cream to place on a stick that will turn red if there is water in the tank? Unfortunately, I did not have the trawler surveyed because I was stupid and too trusting and now I regret it. But, the trawler is mine now so no need to cry over spilled milk. I got her at a good price (I think) and I just recently started sanding the exterior to paint her and put rails on her, but I love the looks and the lines of this trawler and I like her even more without rails, but I am told that it is dangerous not to have the rails installed and that I should, for my safety. The Eagle trawler came with a sailable Boston Whaler Squall 9 dingy which is not in a very good shape but it is all there and floats but I was told that the foam inside between the interior hull and the exterior hull is soaked with water because it weighs more than what it supposed to weight? 125 Lbs? it came with mast, boom, sail, rudder etc. It just looks rough and also needs refurbishing (painting) which I am planning to do after I am done with the trawler.

    The trawler hull is like a tank and thick and it is in good shape. The upper part, the cabin is made out of wood encased in fiberglass. Needless to say, it is a 40-year-old boat so it has two small areas that are rotted and some parts of the flybridge cabinets need to be redone and I am planning to do that also. I just had the bimini refurbished and restitched and the dinghy cover also. The interior is in superb condition and everything works, all the electronics are good, the galley works and the heads are good, and I just did the whole aft head with a new toilet and hoses and repainted the toilet base it looks good to me.

    I am looking for information on this trawler and it has been hard to find. I have entered it and googled it and I find very little info if nothing on her. This is my first trawler and I am planning to keep her as I am a liveaboard and I am loving it. Having no experience stinks, I have been reading about diesel left and right trying to learn all I can so I can do the work myself. I am mechanically able, I have worked on gas engines and even rebuild a 454 once. So I can defend myself a little mechanically. But diesel is different and it has been a new experience for me.

    Anything you can help me with will be infinitely appreciated and thankful. I want to take her into open water, and I told to be careful with a single screw and yet others tell me that as long as the fuel is clean the engine has a history of being reliable and a good engine (Lehman). Others tell me to make sure that the engine hoses are all new and double clamped. The picture attached is before the Squall Dinghy was given to me and placed in its station, and before I did a final sanding of the flybridge and primed it, I will be posting more pictures as I go along. All advice is appreciated!! Thank you for your help in advance!!
    Last edited by 1970Eagle40Trawler; 06-22-2016, 10:51 AM.

  • #2


    Thank you for joining!

    We can tackle things as they come up, but here is a start.

    Anything Lehman: http://americandieselcorp.com/

    As for the fuel. The tanks are Black Iron, the sludge you see is algae, any bio side you use will knock the algae off and make it worse.
    You need to clean the fuel tanks, and will have to do so a couple of times.
    It is also important to keep the tank fuel to keep them from rusting, but then if you don't run the boat, the fuel gets old and you are back to square one.
    Engine Sales and Service
    Ph +1 954.463.1515
    Fx +1
    954.463.4904
    Toll Free: 800.622.6747

    oparker@parkeryacht.com
    www.parkeryacht.com

    Member of the MSHS Group

    Comment


    • #3
      Thank you for the invitation! I will look into cleaning the fuel tanks, and I do run the engine every week and run it for two hours and I do the same with the generator. I am also getting ready to take her out periodically to get acquainted with her since this is my first trawler, my other boat was a 17 footer Sugar Sand Tango. Any suggestions about replacing the fuel tanks with something better? Will the algae collect in the filters and not affect the fuel injection system? There are like 4 filters for the fuel in this boat. Thank you for the advice and the site.

      Comment


      • #4
        If it was anything like my boat, the filter on the boat will clog and things slow down, then stop. Not good when in open water, or when coming to a dock.
        Replacing the tanks are a challenge, first you need to pull the engine, then cut the old tanks out, and when the new tanks go in, they can't be as big.
        That is if is set up the way mine was, which was two 150 gal tanks midship each side out board of the main engine.
        I never did replace the tanks in mine, and if I did, I was going to re-power, all which led me down the line of getting another boat.
        Engine Sales and Service
        Ph +1 954.463.1515
        Fx +1
        954.463.4904
        Toll Free: 800.622.6747

        oparker@parkeryacht.com
        www.parkeryacht.com

        Member of the MSHS Group

        Comment


        • #5
          Wow! Mine is the same, so I think cleaning the tanks is the thing to do. Thanks for the info!
          Here are some pictures of the rotted areas and where the PO placed the winch. The winch pulls in that area and has caused some cracks and a leak there. I am removing it and I want to bring everything back to the way it used to be concerning the boom. Do you have any pictures of how the boom was set up with the tackle and the blocks? Is that what it is called, sorry still learning! Also, did you had davits on yours and if you did do you have pictures of how the davits were set up, I am about to install the davits and I would love to have pictures of the roping set up? Or is it called block and tackle? The PO removed a bunch of stuff and I am trying to install and keep as much of the original set up as possible. You can see the transom door is sitting right there by the winch also. He also installed around the boat synthetic board and removed the teak and I am also working on that and installing a metal edge to make it look good. A full project, I guess is true that ignorance is bliss! That is until now! lol!

          BTW, I did called American Diesel and ordered the owner's manual for the Ford Lehman 120. Thanks for the site address, I appreciated very much any info on this boat, thanks again!
          Last edited by 1970Eagle40Trawler; 06-22-2016, 01:27 PM.

          Comment


          • #6
            Here is the Aft bathroom before and after...

            Comment


            • #7
              Mine was a "sedan", my friend had the dual cabin.
              Yes, the "roping" set up is block and tackle.
              A "bathroom" is called the "head" Click image for larger version

Name:	Pics 122R.jpg
Views:	1
Size:	47.4 KB
ID:	17651 Click image for larger version

Name:	P7060062.jpg
Views:	1
Size:	84.5 KB
ID:	17652 .
              Engine Sales and Service
              Ph +1 954.463.1515
              Fx +1
              954.463.4904
              Toll Free: 800.622.6747

              oparker@parkeryacht.com
              www.parkeryacht.com

              Member of the MSHS Group

              Comment


              • 1970Eagle40Trawler
                1970Eagle40Trawler commented
                Editing a comment
                Love the look of those Trawlers they look awesome, compared to mine! lol! Could I ask for more pictures? I would love to see some pictures of all around, as I am trying to finish mine. Now I see how the rails were done. I also have the dual cabin. Who made the Eagle? Where could I get a manual for this trawler? I am willing to buy copies and pay for shipping. I am desperately looking for information on this boat and it is been very hard to come by. Hardly anything on the internet. Anything would be greatly appreciated...thanks!

            • #8
              Eagle 40 WELCOME aboard

              Please feel free to contact me regarding your fuel 'quality' issues. I sense you may need some in-site to these iron monsters.
              Last edited by Absolute; 06-22-2016, 06:47 PM. Reason: 727-688-3804
              Absolute Tank Cleaning
              www.AbsoluteTankCleaning.com

              Comment


              • 1970Eagle40Trawler
                1970Eagle40Trawler commented
                Editing a comment
                I will, thanks, I am biting here more than I can chew, I have ten projects cooking right now. I am dealing with the cabin and painting it. As soon as I am on the tanks I will contact you. Thank you for your offer. I was starting the engine every week, I have stopped that, should I continue to run the engine? or is that a bad thing? I am also reading Nigel Calder, Marine Diesel Engines, and It said that running it without a load is not a good thing? What is your take on that? Thanks!

            • #9
              Well, I got bad news, the tanks have to be replaced, no way to inspect them, no way to clean them. The port side tank has rust on top but it could not be inspected because it is buried and the top of the tank can not be accessed. The tanks were built custom made for this boat so new tanks would have to be built according to the specs of this boat.

              Now, I am thinking how to remove them. Anyone knows how much to remove an engine? Can the tanks be removed by removing the floor rather than the engine? I have carpet on the floor of the trawler and I was in the process of removing it. I noticed that there are 3/4 inch floor decking boards with screws, I could remove those after taking the seats out.
              Any thoughts on this process?

              Note: I want positive advice, I would like to hear how it can be done, rather than the opposite. I am not interested in buying another boat.

              http://savingtortuga.blogspot.com/20...placement.html -It can be done, but removing the engine is what I am trying to avoid.

              Thank you to all!

              Comment


              • #10
                This has been done many times, slide port engine to centerline of vessel (this is a good time to evaluate the rubber hoses and belts for replacement).


                Best to determine connection points on existing tank such as fill, vent, sending unit, feed(s) and return(s).
                Document as must as possible before sizes and dimension are very necessary.

                Cut existing tank up into pieces, remove all.

                Install multiple smaller tanks in foot print of larger existing tank.
                Manifold piping from tank to tank will be required then to existing feed and return lines.
                I have seen tanks stacked and side by side, best to go with side by side.
                New tank size will be determined by the smallest clearance you have between hatch to engine space and clearance between engine and hull.

                Repeat the process for starboard side.

                May sound over whelming, but you eat an elephant "one bite at a time".
                Absolute Tank Cleaning
                www.AbsoluteTankCleaning.com

                Comment


                • #11
                  Originally posted by Absolute View Post
                  This has been done many times, slide port engine to centerline of vessel (this is a good time to evaluate the rubber hoses and belts for replacement).


                  Best to determine connection points on existing tank such as fill, vent, sending unit, feed(s) and return(s).
                  Document as must as possible before sizes and dimension are very necessary.

                  Cut existing tank up into pieces, remove all.

                  Install multiple smaller tanks in foot print of larger existing tank.
                  Manifold piping from tank to tank will be required then to existing feed and return lines.
                  I have seen tanks stacked and side by side, best to go with side by side.
                  New tank size will be determined by the smallest clearance you have between hatch to engine space and clearance between engine and hull.

                  Repeat the process for starboard side.

                  May sound over whelming, but you eat an elephant "one bite at a time".
                  As stated above. Although I would probable pull engine up and set on salon floor.
                  Engine Sales and Service
                  Ph +1 954.463.1515
                  Fx +1
                  954.463.4904
                  Toll Free: 800.622.6747

                  oparker@parkeryacht.com
                  www.parkeryacht.com

                  Member of the MSHS Group

                  Comment


                  • #12
                    Hey guys,
                    I am restoring (aka pulling nails from its coffin) a 1972 Eagle 40.
                    Has a Perkins 6.354 non-working generator and a fair amount of rot; certainly not a financially savvy purchase but we are having a good time putting it back together. Rebuilt the flybridge, front windows and aft cabin window. Here are some pics of the work in progress

                    Comment


                    • #13
                      They are a labor of love.
                      Two thoughts. Take the flybridge off and start new.
                      Ditch the genny, get a 5kw NL.
                      You can thank me later.
                      Engine Sales and Service
                      Ph +1 954.463.1515
                      Fx +1
                      954.463.4904
                      Toll Free: 800.622.6747

                      oparker@parkeryacht.com
                      www.parkeryacht.com

                      Member of the MSHS Group

                      Comment

                      Working...
                      X